PLEASE JOIN US FOR THE

EAO CRC SUMMIT 2018

Thursday, April 26, 2018, 4:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Friday, April 27, 2018, 7:30 am – 5:00 pm

Welcome Reception to be held Thursday evening

JW Marriott Essex House New York
160 Central Park South
New York, NY 10019

“WHY”: What Factors Are Driving the Increasing Incidence of Young Adult Colorectal Cancer – A “State-of-the-Science” Review

This CME Conference is being jointly provided by the Colon Cancer Foundation and Northwell Health

 

SCHEDULE

Thursday, April 26 4:00 – 7:30 PM Family Health History Symposium – Transforming Family Health History Ascertainment and Colorectal Cancer Preventive Services in Primary Care: A National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable Family History Early Age Onset Task Group Special Meeting
Thursday, April 26 7:30 – 8:30 PM President’s Reception
Friday, April 27 7:30 AM – 8:00 PM Continental Breakfast and Registration
Friday, April 27 8:00 AM – 8:15 AM
Welcome And Overview Of The Day: Framing The Conversation
Friday, April 27 8:15 AM – 8:45 AM Keynote Address: Rebecca Siegel, MPH
Friday, April 27 8:45 AM – 9:45 AM Part I: “The Usual Suspects”: A Closer Look – Persons of Interest
Friday, April 27 9:45 AM – 10:00 AM Networking Coffee Break/Exhibitor Hall Open
Friday, April 27 10:00 AM – 11:35 AM Part II: Life Course Epidemiology: Additional Possible Causes Of Young Onset Colorectal Cancer
Friday, April 27 11:35 AM – 1:15 PM Lunch and Learn Breakout Sessions: “Demystifying Genetic Testing – From A To Z”, “50 Is The Finish Line – Earlier Conversations Lead To On Time Evidence Based Screening”, and “New And Emerging Minimally Invasive Technologies Designed To Identify Individuals With Colorectal Cancer: Can These Methods Be Deployed To Protect Young Adults From delayed & Late Stage Diagnosis”
Friday, April 27 1:15 PM – 1:30 PM Networking Break/Exhibit Hall Open
Friday, April 27 1:30 PM – 2:55 PM Part II Continued: “Persons Of Interest”: Life Course And Neuveau Epidemiology: Additional Possible Causes of Microsatelite Stable (MSS) Young Onset Colorectal Cancer And How To Evaluate Them
Friday, April 27 2:55 PM – 3:10 PM Networking Coffee Break/Exhibit Hall Open
Friday, April 27 3:10 PM – 4:40 PM Part III: Current Efforts To Address EAO CRC Morbidity and Mortality: Causation Research: Adjusting Screening/Surveillance Guidelines: Family Health History and Earliest Possible Stage Diagnosis – the NCCRT Tool Kit Update
Friday, April 27 4:40 PM – 5:30 PM Group Discussion And Commitments To Next Steps, Meeting Summary And Overview Of The EAO CRC Strategic Plan Moving Forward

CO-CHAIRS

Thomas K. Weber MD FACS

Course Director and Host

Director of Surgical Oncology; Northwest Region at Northwell Health
Founder and President, Colon Cancer Foundation

Martha Raymond MA

Course Co-Director

Founder, Raymond Foundation
Founding Co-Chair, GI Cancers Alliance

Susan K. Peterson PhD MPH

Course Co-Director

Professor of Behavioral Science
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

COURSE OBJECTIVES

This event will bring together leading clinicians, scientists as well as early age onset (EAO) colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors and Caregivers from across the country. The program will provide extensive opportunities for participants to advance their understanding of the rapidly increasing incidence of rectal and colon cancer among young adults under 50 years of age in the U.S. and abroad.

This ground-breaking program will, for a fourth year, provide all participants the opportunity to hear and question leading clinicians and researchers on the clinical care, epidemiology, pathogenesis, genomics and genetics of EAO-CRC. Important Break-Out Sessions will also address the challenges of genetic testing, the importance of family health history ascertainment and the possible contribution of novel testing technologies in identifying young adult CRC patients at the earliest possible, most curable, stages of colorectal cancer.

The course will include lectures, workshops and panel discussions designed to advance the “state-of-the-science” addressing EAO-CRC. Our faculty will once again be world class speakers. With major additional inspiring programmatic contributions from the Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Survivor Community of the United States and beyond.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  • Provide an expert review of the latest published information on the increasing incidence and mortality associated with Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer in the United States and globally.
  • Review the State-of-the-Science regarding the known and possible causes of the increasing incidence of EAO-CRC including alterations in our food and water supply, the contribution of novel germline genetic factors and etiologic clues based on the molecular biology of EAO-CRC cancers.
  • Provide an evidence-based framework for reducing risk, increasing early stage diagnosis and improving treatment and outcomes for young adult colorectal cancer patients.
  • Define the research priorities for understanding the causes of EAO-CRC moving forward.

PLANNED PRESENTATIONS INCLUDE

SPECIAL SYMPOSIUM – APRIL 26, 4:30 – 8:30 PM
Transforming Family Health History Ascertainment and Colorectal Cancer: Preventive Services in Primary Care: An Update from the NCCRT Family History Early Age Onset Task Group

SLIDES AVAILABLE HERE

  • Opening Remarks
    • Thomas K. Weber, MD, FACS, Northwell Health, Colon Cancer Foundation
  • Overview and Introduction to the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT) and the Family History Early Age Onset Colroectal Cancer Task Group
    • Dennis Ahnen, MD, AGAF, FACG, University of Colorado School of Medicine
    • Paul Schroy, III, MD, MPH, Boston University School of Medicine
  • Framing the Familial/Hereditary Component and Other Opportunities to Identify Those Most at Risk 
    • Swati G. Patel, MD, MS, University of Colorado Anshutz Medical Center
    • Heather Hampel, MS, LGC, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center
    • Christine Louise E. Molmenti, MPH, PhD, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research/Northwell
  • First Look – The NCCRT Risk Assessment and Screening Toolkit to Detect Familial, Hereditary and Early Onset Colorectal Cancer: Summary of Current Practices and Known Barriers Related to the Identification, Screening and Management of Patients at Increased CRC Risk
    • Emily Edleman, MS, The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine
  • Opportunities with regard to Electronic Health Record Systems
    • Shelly Yu, MPH, American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, Inc.
  • First Look – The NCCRT Risk Assessment and Screening Toolkit to Detect Familial, Hereditary and Early Onset Colorectal Cancer:
    • Family History Ascertainment and Risk Assessment Tools Currently on the Market
    • Overview of the Toolkit Goals, Core Objectives, Conclusions and Limitations;
    • Suggestions for Implementation and Dissemination;
    • Plans for Future Follow up and Programming.
      • Emily Edleman, MS, The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine
  • Primary Care Leadership in Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology 
    • Dennis Ahnen, MD, AGAF, FACG, University of Colorado School of Medicine
    • Durado Brooks, MD, MPH, American Cancer Society
    • Maureen Killackey, MD, New York Presbyterian/Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center
    • Jennifer Reich, MD, Orange Regional Medical Center and Valley Hospital
    • Randa Sifri, MD, Thomas Jefferson University
APRIL 27, 7:30 AM – 5:30 PM
Welcome and Overview of the Day: Introductions and Framing the Conversation
The Usual Suspects – A Closer Look:
  • Colorectal Cancer Incidence Patterns In The United States, 1974-2013
    • Rebecca L. Siegel, MPH, American Cancer Society
  • Risk Factors For Early Onset Colorectal Cancer
    • Christine L. Sardo Molmenti, MPH, PhD, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research
  • All age Global Colorectal Cancer Incidence Trends
    • Thomas K. Weber, MD, FACS, Northwell Health
Life Course And “Neuveau” Epidemiology – Additional Possible Causes of Early Onset Colorectal Cancer:
  • In “Our” Opinion. What Is Causing The Rising Incidence of EAO CRC: A Structured Analysis
    • Roni Rabin, New York Times
  • The Molecular Biology of Microsatelite Stable (MSS) Young Onset Colorectal Cancer. Clues to Etiology Based On Molecular Genetics
    • Dr. Jose Perea’, MD, PhD, Department of Surgery, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz University Hospital
  • The Genetic and Epigenetic Basis of Early Onset Colorectal Cancer
    • C. Richard Boland, MD, AGAF, UCSD School of Medicine
  • Causation Research – The First Annual Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin Memorial Lecture “We Are What We Eat”
    • Benoit Chassaing, PhD, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Georgia State University
  • Environmental Toxins And Young Adult Colorectal Cancer Incidence
    • Richard Woychik, PhD NIH, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
  • Moving Beyong Lynch, FAP and MYH Associated Colorectal Cancer: What’s New In The Genetics Of Young Adult Coloretal Cancer Incidence
    • Zsophia Stadler, MD, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Lunch And Learn Breakout Sessions:
  • Demystifying Genetic Counseling and Testing for Colorectal Cancer – Ethical, Familial, Financial, Legal and Psychosocial Implications
    • Susan Peterson, MD, PhD, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center
    • Heather Hampel, MS, LGC, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center
    • Julia Smith, MD, PhD, NYU Langone Breast Cancer Screening Program
    • Lanie Ross, MD, PhD, The University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital
    • Robin Beth Dubin, AliveAndKickn
    • David Dubin, Sema4 Genomics, a Mount Sinai Venture, AliveAndKickn
    • Benjamin Smith, JD, New York Legal Assistance Group
  • 50 Is The Finish Line – Earlier Conversations Leading To On Time Evidence Based Screening Building on 80 by 2018
    • Whitney Jones, MD, Midwest Gastroenterology Associates
    • Anne Carlson, Colon Cancer Coalition
    • Ravi Sharaf, MD, MS Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell
    • Jennifer Reich, MD Orange Medical Center and Valley Hospital
    • Sarah Debord, Colon Cancer Coaltion
    • Stacy Hurt, MHA, MBA, Colon Cancer Coalition
    • Vanessa Ghigliotty, CPN, N2Y Grassroots Advocacy Chairperson
  • New And Emerging Minimally Invasive Technologies: Can These Methods Be Deployed To Protect Young Adults From Delayed and Late Stage Diagnosis?
    • David Yavin, PhD, Medial Early Sign
    • Mark Boyle, In Vitro Diagnostics
    • Barry Berger, MD, FACP, Exact Sciences
    • Noel Doehny, Epigenomics
    • Vivane Guay, Bracco Diagnostics
    • Judy Yee, MD, Montefiore Medical Center
Current Efforts To Address EAO-CRC Morbidity And Mortality:
  • Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Clinical And Research Priorities Moving Forward
    • Mary Doroshenk, MA, National Colorectal Cancer Round Table
    • Thomas K. Weber, MD, FACS, Northwell Health, Colon Cancer Foundation
    • Julienne Gede Edwards, MA, JD Fight CRC
  • Do Modeling and Other Data Updates Suggest Modifications in Screening Guideline for Young Adults?
    • Ann Zauber, PhD, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
  • Family Health History And Earliest Possible Stage Diagnosis
    • Dennis Ahnen, MD, FACG, UC Denver
    • Paul Schroy III, MD, MPH, Boston University School of Medicine
    • Emily Edleman, MS, CGC, The Jackson Laboratory

ACCOMMODATIONS

J.W. Marriott Essex House

160 Central Park South

New York, NY  10019

The Colon Cancer Foundation has reserved a small block of rooms at the J.W. Marriott Essex House. Please use the link below to make your reservation. Additional rooms may be available by contacting the hotel directly at (212) 247-0300.

https://aws.passkey.com/go/northwellhlth

In addition to accommodations that may be available at the J.W. Marriott Essex House please see the list below for additional hotels offering accommodations at varying price points. 

Hotels Near J.W. Marriott Essex House

Hilton Garden Inn Hotel – Central Park South

237 W 54th St, New York, NY 10019

3.5 stars;  average room price – $289

http://www.hgicentralparknyhotel.com/#gref

Phone:(212) 253-6000

Courtyard Marriott – Central Park

1717 Broadway, New York, NY 10019  (Bet. 54th & 55th Street)

3.5 stars; average room price – $289

http://www.marriott.com/hotels/hotel-photos/nycpk-courtyard-new-york-manhattan-central-park/

Phone:  (212) 324-3773

Residence Inn – Marriott-Central Park

1717 Broadway, New York, NY 10019  (Bet. 54th & 55th Street)

3.5 Stars;  Average room price – $289

http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/nycpr-residence-inn-new-york-manhattan-central-park/

Phone:(212) 324-3774

Quin Hotel

101 West 57th Street at Sixth Avenue, New York, NY 10019

4.5 Stars:  Average room price – $250

http://www.thequinhotel.com/

Phone:  (212) 245-7846

Parker New York

119 W 56th St, New York, NY 10019

4 Stars:  Average room price $270

http://www.parkernewyork.com/home/

Phone:(212) 245-5000

Salisbury Hotel

123 W 57th St, New York, NY 10019

3 Stars;  Average room price $200

http://www.nycsalisbury.com/

Phone:(212) 246-1300

PARKING

There are many parking garages and lots near the JW Marriott Essex House. Please visit the three websites below for a thorough listing and assistance in pre paying for a reservation.

TRANSPORTATION

JW MARRIOTT ESSEX HOUSE – EMPIRE CLS WORLDWIDE CHAUFFEURED SERVICES

The JW Marriott Essex House offers transportation service from NYC airports to the hotel through Empire CLS Worldwide Chauffeured Services. Pricing can be viewed HERE. Fees are all-inclusive of the gratuity, taxes, and tolls and can be charged to the guest’s hotel room bill.

For additional information please contact the Concierge at  212.484.4463

SUPER SHUTTLE 

Super Shuttle serves John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), LaGuardia Airport (LGA), Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR), Long Island MacArthur Airport (ISP) and the surrounding areas.

Choose from:

  • Non-stop service (direct service from pickup to drop off, no stops)
  • Shared-ride (share the ride with others travelling in the same direction, may include stops)
  • Premium (private, chauffeured sedan or SUV service)

NYC TAXI

Alternatively there is a taxi stand at each NYC airport terminal.  Taxis from LGA are roughly $50.  From JFK they are a flat rate of $52 plus tolls and tip (About $65-$70 total). And from Newark (EWR) roughly $90-95.

UBER  

Uber picks up from all three airports as well and an “Uber X” would cost roughly the same amount as a taxi. The Uber app can be downloaded HERE.

FACULTY

This year the Summit will feature presentations from EAO-CRC survivors, caregivers clinicians from the nation’s leading cancer centers, and representatives of CRC advocacy organizations including AliveAndKickn, American Cancer Society, Boston University School of Medicine, Columbia University, Colon Cancer Coalition, Colon Cancer Prevention Project, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Fight Colorectal Cancer, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz University Hospital, Georgia State University, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai Hospital, Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, The Kenneth Offit Lab, Michael’s Mission, Midwest Gastroenterology Associates, Mt. Sinai Hospital, NIH, National Institute of Environmental Sciences and National Toxicology Program, National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable, the Never Too Young Coalition, New York Citywide Colon Cancer Control Coalition, New York Legal Assistance Group, New York Times, New York Presbyterian/Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, Orange Regional Medical Center and Valley Hospital, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Raymond Foundation, University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital, University of Colorado, and UCSD School of Medicine – San Diego.
Dennis J. Ahnen MD AGAF FACGUniversity of Colorado School of Medicine
Barry Berger, MD, FACPExact Sciences Corporation, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston MA
C. Richard Boland MD AGAFUCSD School of Medicine, San Diego
Durado Brooks, MD, MPHAmerican Cancer Society
Anne CarlsonColon Cancer Coalition
Benoit Chassaing PhDGeorgia State University, Institute for Biomedical Sciences
Sarah DebordColon Cancer Coalition
Noel DoehnyEpigenomics
David DubinSema4 Genomics, a Mount Sinai Venture, AliveAndKickn
Robin Beth Dubin, MBAAliveAndKickn
Emily Edelman, MS, CGC The Jackson Laboratory
Julienne Gede Edwards, MA, JDFight Colorectal Cancer
Vanessa GhighliottyPatient Advocate
Vivian GuayBracco Diagnostics
Heather Hampel MS LGCThe Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center
Stacy Hurt, MHA, MBAColon Cancer Coalition
Whitney Jones MDMidwest Gastroenterology Associates, Colon Cancer Prevention Project

Maureen Killackey, MDNew York Presbyterian/Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center
Caleb LevellNational Colorectal Cancer Roundtable, American Cancer Society
Christine Louise S. Molmenti PhDFeinstein Institute for Medical Research, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell
Alan Murphy, BComm, MAcc, ACAPatient Advocate, KKR & Co., L.P.
Susan Pfau, MA, Marriage & Family TherapyMental Health Practitioner, Family Innovations, Children’s Therapy Skills Services
Swati G. Patel, MDUniversity of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center
Jose’ Perea MD PhDFundacion Jimenez Diaz University Hospital
Roni Caryn Rabin
New York Times
Susan Peterson PhD, MPH The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Martha Raymond MA CPNMichael’s Mission, The Raymond Foundation
Jennifer Reich, MDOrange Regional Medical Center and Valley Hospital
Lanie Friedman Ross MD PhD The University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital
Benjamin Smith JDNew York Legal Assistance Group
Julia A. Smith MD, PhDLaura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center
Paul Schroy III MD PhDBoston University School of Medicine
Ravi Sharaf MD MS Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell
Rebecca L. Siegel, MPHAmerican Cancer Society
Randa Sifri, MDThomas Jefferson University
Zsophia Stadler MDMemorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, The Kenneth Offit Lab
Thomas K. Weber MD FACSDirector of Surgical Oncology; Northwest Region at Northwell Health
Richard Woychik, PhDNational Institute of Environmental Sciences and National Toxicology Program
David Yavin PhD Medial Early Sign
Judy Yee, MD, FACRMontefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Shelly Yu, MPH American Cancer Society
Ann Zauber, PhDCancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

SPONSORS

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

The sponsors of the EAO-CRC Summit make it possible for us to build public awareness of colorectal cancer (CRC) including hereditary colorectal cancer and the importance of timely screening and prevention.  Their support also allows us to help sponsor prevention programs in New York City including screening efforts for the uninsured and innovative translational research projects focused on early age onset of colorectal cancer.

As a sponsor of the Summit you have the opportunity to reach thousands who join us each year to raise awareness of this deadly and yet preventable disease.

If you are interested in joining our community of Sponsors, please look at our Corporate Sponsor Opportunities or contact us at 914.305.6675.

CME INFORMATION

CME Accreditation:  This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Northwell Health and The Colon Cancer Foundation. Northwell Health is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation:  Northwell Health designates this live educational activity for 8.75 AMA PRA Category 1 credits TM .   Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Certificate of Attendance:  Northwell Health will provide all attendees with a Certificate of Completion indicating 875 AMA PRA Category 1 credits TM.

Disclosure Policy:  Northwell Health adheres to the ACCME’s Standards for Commercial Support. Any individuals in a position to control the content of a CME activity, including faculty, planners, reviewers or others, are required to disclose all relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. All relevant conflicts of interest will be resolved prior to the commencement of the activity.

REGISTRATION

Northwell Employee 2 Days (April 26 4:30 – 8:30 PM – Non CME – and April 27 7:30 AM – 5:30 PM)MD/PhD
NPs/Pas/RNs and Other Health Care Professionals
Patient/Survivor Advocate
Fellow/Resident/Med Student
200.00
170.00
55.00
55.00
Non – Northwell Employee 2 Days (April 26 4:30 – 8:30 PM – Non CME – and April 27 7:30 AM – 5:30 PM)MD/PhD
NPs/PAs/RNs Other Health Care Professionals
Patient/Survivor Advocate
Fellow/Resident/Med Student
230.00
200.00
55.00
55.00
Northwell Employee 1 day – April 26, 4:30 PM – 8:30 PM (not for CME) MD/PhDN
Ps/Pas/RNs and Other Health Care Professionals
Patient/Survivor Advocate
Fellow/Resident/Med Student
125.00
125.00
40.00
40.00
Non-Northwell Employee 1 day – April 26, 4:30 PM – 8:30 PM (not for CME) MD/PhD
NPs/PAs/RNs and Other Health Care Professionals
Patient/Survivor Advocate
Fellow/Resident/Med Student
150.00
150.00
40.00
40.00
Northwell Employee 1 day – April 27, 7:30 AM – 5:30 PM MD/PhD
NPs/Pas/RNs and Other Health Care Professionals
Patient/Survivor Advocate
Fellow/Resident/Med Studen
150.00
120.00
40.00
40.00
Non – Northwell Employee 1 day – April 27, 7:30 AM – 5:30 PM MD/PhD
NPs/PAs/RNs and Other Health Care Professionals
Patient/Survivor Advocate
Fellow/Resident/Med Student
180.00
150.00
40.00
40.00